Famous Pugilists by Mick Hill

 Mick Hill has recently produced a worthy book on the English Prize Ring. For those of you that don't know Mick, he has long held an interest in boxing, and in particular, the days of bare-knuckle fighting. Mick has produced a 200-page book on the prominent boxers of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries and he has ensured that many of the lesser-known names of this period are included, in the form of mini-biographies.

 There are nearly 80 pugilists featured within the book and some of them will be new to even the most fervent follower of boxing during the bare-knuckle age. Two of the first three names included within the book, for instance, are Tom Pipes and Bill Gretting, and it is a welcome change to see the stories of men such as these recorded.

 

As well as producing a page on each boxer which describes their achievements Mick has also taken the trouble to produce their fighting record and virtually all of them also have an illustration. Another welcome addition is the inclusion of the nickname, and so many of these boxers were well-known by their nickname. As an example, the exploits of Jeremy Massey aka "The Stunted Lifeguardsman" can be followed on page 184 and, as well as the biographical details relating to his career, which are spread across two pages, one call also see full details of his fight record. 18 contests are listed for the period between 1842 and 1856 and one will find that Massey was once proclaimed the "Best in the land at Featherweight".

 It is a nice little book and would be a welcome addition to the bookshelves of a boxing bibliophile. The price is £13.99.

 To purchase a copy please order from www.fastprint.net/bookshop or Amazon. On Amazon

 http://www.amazon.co.uk/Famous-Pugilists-English-Prize-Ri/dp/178035505X/ref=sr_1_25?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1365594385&sr=1-25&keywords=bareknuckle+boxing

Or to contact Mick direct please email This email address is being protected from spam bots, you need Javascript enabled to view it

 

Read more...
 

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Written by Rob Snell   
Thursday, 22 November 2007
Article Index
Armand Emanuel
Page 2

Name: Armand Emanuel
Career Record: click
Alias: The Boxing Barrister
Nationality: US American
Birthplace: Montreal, QC, Canada
Hometown: San Francisco, CA
Born: 1906-10-22
Height: 6′ 0½″

Emanuel was an attorney who claimed he made more money in the ring than in a courtroom.

Former National A.A.U. Heavyweight Champion.

James P. Dawson of the New York Times gave this description of him following his victory over Mike McTigue on 7 June 1928: "Emanuel is a busy youngster, with a good left hand but a crude attack. He is a weak hitter and has a jaw which is none too strong in withstanding punishment."

 

emanuel-1
 
Oakland Tribune
21 August 1928

EMANUEL MAKES BIG HIT
WITH SONOMA COUNTY
BOXING ENTHUSIASTS

By BOB SHAND

ARMAND EMANUEL, the boxing barrister who meets Mickey Walker-in a ten-round fight in San Francisco next Monday evening, has broken camp at Healdslburg and returned to San Francisco. But before he left the Sonoma county town Emanuel rekindled boxing enthusiasm in Healdsburg and made many new fans. Not since the days of Ralph Rose has Healdsburg been so excited over an athletic event.

They think Emanuel is the coming heavyweight champion of the world and they would not be surprised were Armand to knock Walker silly next, week. Strangely enough Emanuel has been training at "Camp Rose," where the late Ralph Rose was first discovered. The place has changed hands now but retains the old name. When Emanuel worked out Sunday Guy Rose, brother of the famous shot-putter, was among those present. He is in business in Healdsburg.

Fans from Santa, Rosa, headed by Promoter Frankie Sealer, were at the ringside. Other near-by cities were well represented. The Healdsburg ranchers quit worrying about the price of prunes and the chances of the banks foreclosing on the mortgages to see the San Francisco barrister go through his training stunts.

The camp located on the banks of  the Russian river  At the foot of  Fitch mountain. The ring is pitched in a corner of an old dunce pavilion and boxers with overhead swings cannot operate because or a  huge oak tree winch spreads  all over the ring providing shade for the perspiring athletes .

Dolph Thomas is in charge of the training. Charles Emanuel father of Armand is chairman of the reception committee and does a  nice job. Among the sparring partners are Joe Hughes, Jimmy Evans, and Johnny Jackson. The managers of the boxers are also in the camp. Then there is a camp barber, a camp cook, some camp pests and the usual bunch of rum-dums who infest a prominent boxer's training quarters.

Emanuelas made a big hit with the natives. If he has a high hat he does not wear it. He has read more books than Gene Tunney ever heard of but. makes no mention or the fact He Is well educated and intellectual, otherwise he never would have passed the bar examination,  but be does not seek  to force his intelligence on the country folks . Armand assumes the role of  the young man trying to get by and he makes Himself as inconspicuous  as possible. He does not broadcast the fact that he went the limit Tommy Loughran, the champion of his class, and he has nothing to say about the coming fight  with Walker. If he intends knocking  Mickey’s block off he is keeping his
secret to himself.

Regarding his fighting ability, that is a matter of opinion. There is no better boxer in any division than young Emanuel and he is as fast as a bullet. He handles his sparring partners with ease, but he has only one big man in camp, Joe Hughes, and Joe gives a clever exhibition of an ice wagon. The other hired men are welterweights.

Armand  seems to be putting more snap into his punches and he hits with deadly accuracy. However it remains to be seen how he will last against a rushing, tearing fighter like Walker, If Mickey works at his trade next Monday.

In other fights Emanuel appeared at sea when rushed. He could not hit going away and he was bothered when forced to the ropes. You cannot tell by training bouts if he has overcomes these faults and neither can you tell if he is punching harder. To his credit it can be said that he did not fake any knockdowns for the benefit of the spectators.



 
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